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 Post subject: Autonomous sensory meridian response
PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:54 pm 
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broke

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Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is a term used for an experience characterised by a static-like or tingling sensation on the skin that typically begins on the scalp and moves down the back of the neck and upper spine. It has been compared with auditory-tactile synesthesia.[1][2] ASMR signifies the subjective experience of "low-grade euphoria" characterised by "a combination of positive feelings and a distinct static-like tingling sensation on the skin". It is most commonly triggered by specific acoustic, visual and digital media stimuli, and less commonly by intentional attentional control Wikipedia

I came across ASMR, as a youtube phenomena 9-10 years ago right when the scene started to grow. One of the earlier "triggers" (as they are called) was listening to the VR Barber Shop - video. It's not sexual to me in any way, it just a sensual and calming experience.

The reason why I want to bring it up here is to help any of you who suffer from insomnia, depression or PTSD. ASMR can be a great tool for relaxation and/or sample to use in your music. ;)

Here's one of my favourite ASMR-artists. Check it out!



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 Post subject: Re: Autonomous sensory meridian response
PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 11:13 pm 
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hmmmmmm...
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admittedly this video is pretty damn trippy, the sort of thing that might catch you by surprise if you and a few mates did some hallucinogens in a basement in the youtube era and someone popped it on.

that said, i think asmr is general is not well understood, meaning people into it are sort of just doing a lot of trial and error to find what seems to work. they don't know exactly why something works or what's happening to the body.

i'm not too sure how well sampling it would work in music, but that doesn't mean the asmr effect can't be had in that setting. i think a better approach is to design the effect from scratch for a music scenario.

stuff i've tried that works is an ambisonic layer that creates an uncanny proximity effect, with a really good 3D audio implementation you can get past that distance barrier and make someone feel like a sound is right up against their ear or even right inside their head, with headphones on anyway. all of asmr to me is sounds that trigger that proximity effect, especially whispering.

in a live situation you'd have to really know what you're doing to set up a loudspeaker array that properly creates the ambisonic effect.

anyway to me this is the future, we have to eventually tire of what kinds of spatialization you can do with stereo. A lot of soundsystems have decent addressing modes meaning even though they are set up for stereo most of the time, they can totally be configured to handle spatial audio which contains a stereo mix as a foundation.


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 Post subject: Re: Autonomous sensory meridian response
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2017 10:56 am 
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quasi-public
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Regarding the physical component, the tingling and such—I've got a slipped disc in my neck so I was poking and prodding around the area and accidentally found the place where I can press and it will send a tingling shiver down my spine like that VR haircut audio gives me. The body seems to get used to the effect because returns diminish pretty sharply. A while later it works better again. I don't find it particularly relaxing, never mind euphoric or positive.

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 Post subject: Re: Autonomous sensory meridian response
PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2017 2:32 pm 
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Pig
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wayfinder wrote:
Regarding the physical component, the tingling and such—I've got a slipped disc in my neck so I was poking and prodding around the area and accidentally found the place where I can press and it will send a tingling shiver down my spine like that VR haircut audio gives me. The body seems to get used to the effect because returns diminish pretty sharply. A while later it works better again. I don't find it particularly relaxing, never mind euphoric or positive.


I think its more to do with when youre really relaxed and on the verge of falling asleep. Thats when the tingly sensation becomes pleasant.


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